Wally was expected to arrive at 10 AM. I hired him to handle a few minor repairs around our condo. At approximately 10 AM, I received a phone call from Jo who manages our receiving room, and registers contractors as they enter and leave our condominium building. Jo informed me that Wally arrived, but he is not listed on the register of contractors who are permitted to enter the building this day, and therefore she would not be able to allow him in. I confronted the management office, and Wally could enter.

I asked a few questions: when did this process start? How does one go on the register? Why don’t I know about this change in process?

I learned that over the last several months, the management of our building has done a great deal of work to clamp down on rogue contractors coming in the building and doing unsatisfactory work or doing large projects that were not approved. While I appreciate greater integrity in the work approval process, it is also important that changes in policy are well communicated so residents understand expectations before contractors arrive on the day-of to perform work.

This is a simple matter of taking a few minutes to think about how change is going to impact your stakeholders, and then putting a little effort into helping them prepare for the change.

One client did this well. For example, when she hired a new Project Management Office leader, she sent out a communication announcing the new lead, and included a list of priorities she expected this leader to implement. She followed this up with a discussion about the new leaders’ role in a town hall meeting. It was clear to her organization what she was doing and why she was doing it.

The next time you are implementing a change, even a small policy change, I encourage you identify those who will be impacted by the change and help them prepare for it. It can be as simple as some communication.

Dedicated to your profitable transformation,
Steve

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