I recently met my daughter in north central Wisconsin for a weekend of family history research. We spent a full day scouting cemeteries looking for headstones of long deceased relatives. We had remarkable success! We found two previously unknown great-great grandmother’s graves.

Like many Americans, every one of my ancestors was a pioneer. These people experienced change on a scale few of us think about these days. Leaving a familiar and mostly predictable world that was modern compared to their destination, they left loved ones to carve out a new life on the frontier. They had a vision and were strong and resolute in their new purpose.

When leading change, it is crucial to stay strong and resolute. There will be naysayers who might try to derail your vision. There may be other roadblocks. Operational issues may cause concern. Use these disrupters to help legitimize the change.

I love resistance because it helps me clarify my vision, but rarely does it cause a wholesale reevaluation of the change. Operational issues are great because they often prove out the need for the change, or cause course correction. In every case, these situations add material to your catalog of stories you can use to help others through the change.

Call to action:
1. Be sure your purpose is clear in terms of outcomes, and relatable to your employees.
2. Look and listen for resistance. Understand the reasons for it and use it to help build your case for change.
3. Engage front-line employees to identify operational opportunities and challenges with the change. Ask for their help to solve the challenges.
4. Decide now to be resolute and steadfast in driving the change. There is a reason you and your leadership team thought this change was important. Stick to it.

Dedicated to your profitable transformation,
Steve

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